Grace Paley Poetry Series

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Is Pleased to Copresent the 9th Annual
GRACE PALEY POETRY SERIES

 Featuring

Paul Muldoon

Paul Muldoon

Paul Muldoon was born in 1951 in County Armagh, Northern Ireland, and educated in Armagh and at the Queen’s University of Belfast. He is the youngest member of a group of Northern Irish poets—including Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, and Derek Mahon—which gained prominence in the 1960s and 1970s. As a student at Queen’s University, Muldoon was mentored by Heaney. From 1973 to 1986, he worked in Belfast as a radio and television producer for the British Broadcasting Corporation. Since 1987 he has lived in the United States, where he is now Howard G. B. Clark ’21 Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University. Between 1999 and 2004, he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. The End Of The Poem, a collection of his Oxford lectures, was published in 2006. Paul Muldoon’s collections of poetry are New Weather (1973), Mules (1977), Why Brownlee Left (1980), Quoof (1983), Meeting The British (1987), Madoc: A Mystery (1990), The Annals of Chile (1994), Hay (1998), Poems 1968-1998 (2001), Moy Sand and Gravel (2002)-for which he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize-Horse Latitudes (2006), Maggot (2010), The Word on the Street (2013) and his most recent collection, One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems (FSG, 2015). A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Paul Muldoon was given an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in literature in 1996. Other awards in addition to the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry include the 1994 T. S. Eliot Prize, the 1997 Irish Times Poetry Prize, the 2003 Griffin International Prize for Excellence in Poetry, the 2004 American Ireland Fund Literary Award, the 2004 Aspen Prize for Poetry, the 2004 Shakespeare Prize and the 2009 John William Corrington Award for Literary Excellence. He is the current Poetry Editor of the New Yorker Magazine. Muldoon has been described by The Times Literary Supplement as “the most significant English-language poet born since the second World War.” It has been written about his poems that they “remind us of the Elizabethan’s definition of wit, a deadly serious form of play that encompassed far more than mere humor, but included originality and ingenuity, particularly in the forging of concise and startlingly appropriate phrases to capture the paradoxes of human experience. These paradoxes are at play in many of Muldoon’s poems, which will often share classical forms out of the most common street slang or tackle metaphysical questions with the language of advertising slogan and pop records.” He has contributed the librettos for four operas by Daron Hagen: Shining Brow (1992), Vera of Las Vegas (1996), Bandanna (1998) and The Antient Concert (2005), written many books for children including The Last Thesaurus (1995) and Reverse Flannery (2003), edited the Faber Anthology of Contemporary Irish Poetry (1986), The Essential Byron (1989) and the Faber Book of Beasts (1997) in addition to translating the work of Irish poets, including Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, into English and composing the 1989 teleplay Monkeys, which was directed by Danny Boyle. His interests include the rock lyric as well. Muldoon has written for the band The Handsome Family as well as the late Warren Zevon, with whom he collaborated on the 2002 album My Ride’s Here. Paul Muldoon lives with his wife, writer Jean Hanff Korelitz, and their two children near Princeton, New Jersey.

 

Major Jackson

Major Jackson

Major Jackson is the author of four collections of poetry: Roll Deep (2015, Norton); Holding Company (2010, Norton); Hoops (2006, Norton) and Leaving Saturn (2002, University of Georgia Press), winner of a Cave Canem Poetry Prize and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry. He has published poems and essays in recent issues of The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, and in Best American Poetry. Jackson is the recipient of fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Guggenheim Foundation, Pew Fellowships in the Arts, the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress and has been awarded a Pushcart Prize and a Whiting Writers’ Award. He is the Richard A. Dennis Professor at the University of Vermont and the Poetry Editor of the Harvard Review.

 

Cleopatra Mathis

Cleopatra Mathis has published seven collections of poetry. The most recent, from Sarabande Books, are White Sea, 2005, and Book of Dog, 2013, which won the Sheila Motten Book Prize. Her poems have appeared widely in anthologies, textbooks, magazines and journals. Awards for her work include two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, three Pushcart Prizes, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, a Dora Maar Fellowship from the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, a Lavin Award from the Academy of American Poets and the 2001 Jane Kenyon Award for Poetry. Born and raised in Louisiana, she has taught creative writing and English at Dartmouth College since 1982, where she is the Frederick Sessions Beebe ’35 Professor in the Art of Writing.

 

Tony Magistrale

Tony Magistrale

Tony Magistrale has been a Professor in English at the University of Vermont since 1983. He received a B.A. in 1974 from Allegheny College and from the University of Pittsburgh an M.A. in 1976 and a Ph.D. in 1981. He has written several books about Stephen King and Edgar Allan Poe and teaches courses in American literature, gothic horror and poetry. He is also a poet. In 2011, he received Literary Laundry’s Award of Distinction. Among his collections are Entanglements and The Last Soldiers of Love.

 

David Cavanagh

David Cavanagh

David Cavanagh’s most recent book of poems is Straddle, released in 2015 by Salmon Poetry of Ireland. His earlier collections include Cycling in Plato’s Cave, a book of biking-related poems and photos from Fomite Press in 2014, Falling Body from Salmon Poetry in 2009 and The Middleman, also from Salmon Poetry in 2003. His poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies in the U.S., Canada, Ireland and the U.K. Journals include Agenda, The Antigonish Review, CV2, The Dalhousie Review, The Fiddlehead, Grain, The Malahat Review, Rattle, The Shop, Poetry Ireland Review and others. David’s poems have appeared in such anthologies as The Book of Irish American Poetry from the University of Notre Dame Press, The Word Exchange: Anglo-Saxon Poems in Translation from W.W. Norton and So Little Time: Words and Images for a World in Climate Crisis, from Green Writers Press. His work has been supported by grants from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Vermont Arts Council. Born and raised in Montreal, he works for the External Degree Program and is chair of Interdisciplinary Studies at Johnson State College.

On the Campus of the University of Vermont September 25 & 26.
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